Law Review Squared

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May 27, 2021  

Emotional Support Animals and the Fair Housing Act (and other situations)

Service Animals are generally considered reasonable accommodations under the Fair Housing Act. Should Emotional Support Animals be treated similarly? What about in non-housing situations? What documentation should be required for an animal to be accommodated?

The article discussed was: Katie Basalla, Shortening the Leash: Emotional Support Animals under the Fair Housing
Act, 89 U. CIN. L. REV. 140 (2020).

Host: Jo Ann Fernando

Panel: Schenley Kent, Seth Trott, Tony Fernando

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

April 1, 2021  

Shooting Fish (With Firearms)

BONUS EPISODE! California attorney Michael Smith visits with the panel to discus state regulations regarding shooting fish (with firearms), the topic of a law review article he authored. We also discuss: What constitutes good legal writing? What is the value of 'leisure' writing? What happens when you shock a fish with electricity? As well as different approaches to regulation, federalism, and environmental protection.

The article discussed was: Michael Smith, Shooting Fish, 12 Ky. J. Equine, Agric. & Nat. Resources L. 2 (2020).

Guest: Michael Smith

Panel: Tony Fernando, Seth Trott, Courtney Buechler, Jo Ann Fernando

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

March 22, 2021  

Jurors and Social Media

How does social media influence jurors? What concerns are raised when jurors use social media during a trial? What are reasonable restrictions during a trial? How has our understanding of reasonable social media use changed over the past few years? The panel discusses these timely topics as well as baked goods.

The article discussed was: Amy J. St. Eve & Michael A. Zuckerman, Ensuring an Impartial Jury in the Age of Social Media, 11 Duke Law & Technology Review 1-29 (2012)

Host: Schenley Kent

Panel: Tony Fernando, Jo Ann Fernando, Vishal Bajpai

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

March 1, 2021  

E-sports, and the regulation thereof

The panel discusses video games in the context of e-sports, streaming, and how these activities are and/or should be regulated. Covering subjects from performance enhancing drug testing of e-thletes to visas to monetary and 'attention' in-game currencies, there's something in this episode for everyone from the newest n00b to the l33t gamer. 

The article discussed was: Elizabeth Chung, Gotta Catch 'Em All! The Rise of eSports and the Evolution of Its
Regulations, 22 SMU Sci. & TECH. L. REV. 231 (2019).

Host: Tony Fernando

Panel: Seth Trott, Jo Ann Fernando

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

February 15, 2021  

Hot Coffee For Law Day

Professor Michael Mogill joins the panel to discuss how he used Liebeck v. McDonald's Restaurants, the famous 'hot coffee' case, at a Law Day presentation to explain how the jury system works. Other topics discussed include how to teach legal concepts to various non-lawyer/non-law student audiences ranging from children to senior citizens and challenges of teaching law in the time of COVID. 

Article: Michael A. Mogill, Teaching Law Day: A Senior Moment, 1 Stetson J. Advocacy & L. 34 (2014).

Guest: Michael Mogill

Host: Seth Trott

Panel: Schenley Kent, Jo Ann Fernando, Courtney Buechler, Nicole Signer, Tony Fernando

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

February 1, 2021  

Fortnite, the NFL, Dancing, and Copyright

The panel discusses an article that raises a hypothetical, what claim for an NFL player whose endzone dance is copied by a videogame. Join us for a wide ranging discussion that encompasses the constitution, TikTok, motivations for creative people, and more!

The article that was discussed was: Alex Avakiantz, Stealing Swagger: NFL End Zone Celebrations and Fortnite's Fortune,
94 Wash. L. REV. 453 (2019).

Host: Tony Fernando

Panel: Courtney Buechler, Seth Trott, Jo Ann Fernando

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

January 18, 2021  

The Morality of Grading on a Curve

Law school grades are curved. Why? What are they trying to measure? Do curved grades serve students? Employers? Are curved grades moral? The panel discusses these topics and more, after reading an article which presented a case study of a law school which changed its curve.

The article discussed was: Deborah Waire Post, "Power and Morality of Grading - A Case Study and a Few Critical Thoughts on Grade Normalization", 65 UMKC L. Rev. 777 (1997).

Host: Seth Trott

Panel: Schenley Kent, Tony Fernando, Jo Ann Fernando

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

January 4, 2021  

Snitches Get Stiches

What is the object of having an honor code or conduct code? Should law school honor codes have a "toleration clause", which requires a student who becomes aware of an honor code violation to report it? Should school codes be different than professional codes? Do the honor codes at the top law schools differ from the rest? The panel discusses this after having read:

Meredith C. Manuel, Snitches Get Stiches: Ditching the Toleration Clause in Law School Honor Codes, 33 Geo. J. Legal Ethics 703.

Host: Tony Fernando

Panel: Seth Trott, Jo Ann Fernando

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

December 21, 2020  

Handling Judicial Recusal at the Supreme Court

The panel is joined by our first guest-author, Associate Dean Bekah Saidman-Krauss! We discuss an article she wrote which analyzed a proposal by Senator Leahy (D-VT) to allow the Supreme Court to fill recusal based vacancies with retired Justices. The lower courts have mechanisms to replace a judge who recuses themselves, why doesn't the Supreme Court? What effect does not having a replacement mechanism have on their decision making?  

The article discussed is: Bekah Saidman-Krauss, A Second Sitting: Assessing the Constitutionality and Desirability of Allowing Retired Supreme Court Justices to Fill Recusal-Based Vacancies on the Bench. 116 Penn St. L. Rev 253 (2011).

Guest: Bekah Saidman-Krauss

Host: Tony Fernando

Panel: Schenley Kent, Seth Trott, Jo Ann Fernando

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

December 7, 2020  

Business Information and FOIA

The panel considers exemption 4 of the Freedom of Information Act which protects financial and business information. Does this create a right to privacy for corporations? Should business information be protected from disclosure, when the business is doing work for the government? 

The article discussed is: Jane E. Kirtley, Scott Memmel, and Jonathan Anderson, More Substantial Harm than Good: Recrafting FOIA's Exemption 4 after Food Marketing Institute v. Argus Leader Media, 46 Mitchell Hamline L. Rev 497.

Host: Tony Fernando

Panel: Nailah Graves-Manns, Seth Trott, Courtney Buechler

Audio: Mohammed Saleem

Producer: Tony Fernando

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